Posts

Ring test with dung beetles

European legislation requires testing of parasiticides using, among others, dung beetles (OECD GD 122). Currently, Aphodius constans, a dweller species, has been approved as a test species for residues in dung. However, results of tests using A. constans may not be relevant for tunneler species.

Comparison of the environmental properties of parasiticides and harmonisation of the basis for environmental assessment at the EU level

Avermectin and milbemycin parasiticides have a high toxicity to non-target organisms, are often persistent and may have a potential to bioaccumulate. The present project contributes to filling gaps in the database for a complete environmental risk assessment of these parasiticides. In addition, risk management strategies for parasiticides used in pasture animals were discussed. For ivermectin […]

Determination of developmental toxicity of a test chemical to Dipterian dung flies (Scathophaga stercoraria (Scathophagidae), Musca autumnalis (Muscidae))

The aim of the project was to standardise a test guideline with two dung fly species to be used for the environmental risk assessment of veterinary pharmaceuticals, in particular endo- and ectoparasiticides excreted in dung. The test is designed to estimate the developmental toxicity of a test substance to the dung dwelling life stages of […]

Development of a standardised laboratory test with dung beetles for the assessment of the ecotoxicity of veterinary pharmaceuticals

According to European law, the environmental risk assessment of veterinary pharmaceuticals for dung beetles is required for parasiticides for the treatment of pasture animals. Starting with recommendations from the SETAC advisory group DOTTS (Dung Organism Toxicity Test Standardisation), a test system using the widespread temperate dung beetle species Aphodius constans was developed. Together with the […]

Environmental risk assessment of veterinary medicines: Are there data gaps and how can the new legal requirement be met?

The most likely entry pathways of veterinary medicinal products (VMPs) into the environment are via slurry or manure from intensively reared animals to soil, and via dung or urine from animals grazing on pasture. Surface water may be contaminated via run-off or leaching and drainage, or  by direct excretion of pasture animals into water. According […]